So, What’s Next After Thanksgiving?

Thursday brings another Thanksgiving, and Thanksgiving begins the end of another year. The United States and the whole world will collectively pause over turkey and stuffing to ponder the good things in life, and many of us will give thanks to God. And it is always good to give thanks to God (1 Thessalonians 5:18). After all, He “gives to all mankind life and breath and everything” (Acts 17:25).

The holiday presents itself as a fitting resolution to the year’s highs and lows, joys and sorrows, successes and failures. It’s timed perfectly to allow for restful reflection before the generally happy chaos of Christmas. But what if Thanksgiving was meant to be a beginning, and not just another over-fed ending?

Thanksgiving isn’t ever the end in the Christian life because gratitude cannot bear the weight of that responsibility. Gratitude is good — and a means to something greater. It’s meant to fuel our faith in God and deepen our love for God, the Giver. Gratitude does look back, but it’s only a matter of time before it has the Christian looking forward.
.
.
.
.
A Day in The LIfe:
SO, WHAT’S NEXT AFTER THANKSGIVING?
Rudy Ram. Rumbaoa
Fri. 27 Nov. 2o2o
Maui

[photo credit to the owner]

Why Thanksgiving?


Thanksgiving Day is a national holiday celebrated on various dates in Canada, the United States, some of the Caribbean islands, and Liberia. It began as a day of giving thanks for the blessing of the harvest and of the preceding year.

Similarly named festival holidays occur in Germany and Japan.

Thanksgiving is celebrated on the second Monday of October in Canada and on the fourth Thursday of November in the United States, and around the same part of the year in other places. Although Thanksgiving has historical roots in religious and cultural traditions, it has long been celebrated as a secular holiday as well.

Prayers of thanks and special thanksgiving ceremonies are common among almost all religions after harvests and at other times.

The Thanksgiving holiday’s history in North America is rooted in English traditions dating from the Protestant Reformation. It also has aspects of a harvest festival, even though the harvest in New England occurs well before the late-November date on which the modern Thanksgiving holiday is celebrated.

In the English tradition, days of thanksgiving and special thanksgiving religious services became important during the English Reformation in the reign of Henry VIII and in reaction to the large number of religious holidays on the Catholic calendar. Before 1536 there were 95 Church holidays, plus 52 Sundays, when people were required to attend church and forego work and sometimes pay for expensive celebrations. The 1536 reforms reduced the number of Church holidays to 27, but some Puritans wished to completely eliminate all Church holidays, including Christmas and Easter. The holidays were to be replaced by specially called Days of Fasting or Days of Thanksgiving, in response to events that the Puritans viewed as acts of special providence. Unexpected disasters or threats of judgement from on high called for Days of Fasting. Special blessings, viewed as coming from God, called for Days of Thanksgiving.
.
.
A Day in The Life
WHY THANKSGIVING?
Rudy Ram. Rumbaoa
Today@Maui
https://poemssongsphotographsandmemories.wordpress.com
[photo credit to the owner]

Yesterday. Today.

You are the beauty of my eyes the night the first time I saw you. Now, you’re such an ugly, sore of the eyes—nobody even wants to touch or come closer to you.

When we’re still young and caught the attention of others, we thought our being famous have no ending. But when we’re getting older, people just leave where you belong just like they see nothing at all.
Yesterday was a memory, today is a reality.
.
.
.
.
A Day in The Life:
YESTERDAY. TODAY
Wed. 18 Nov. 2o2o, HM
Rudy Ram. Rumbaoa
Today@Maui
wwwpoemssongsphotographsandmemories.wordpress.com

Just Saying…


They barbecue
graveyard tongues
on fires of pikake
gardenia and ilima.

Such a strange time it is…

Drunk with their victories,
a silent evil has gate-crashed
and they feast for our funeral—

no exit, no excuse;
we must hide the words
in the darkness of the night.
.
.
.
JUST SAYING
WE MUST HIDE THE WORDS [In The Darkness of the Night]
Rudy Ram. Rumbaoa
Thu. 22 Oct. 2o2o
Maui
https://poemssongsphotographsandmemories.wordpress.com

Just Saying…

This twisted impasse,
in the bitter chill
they keep their fires
alive by burning
our songs and poems.

Do not risk your life by thinking!
Such a strange time it is…

They knock on your door
at midnight, to smash your lamp.

We must hide our lights
in the darkness of the night.
.
.
.
.
.
JUST SAYING
HIDE OUR LIGHTS [In The Darkness of the NIght]
Rudy Ram. Rumbaoa
Tue. 2o Oct. 2o2o
Maui
wwwpoemssongsphotographsandmemories.wordpress.com

Just Saying…




They smell my mouth
to find out if I have spoken
words of love to anyone.


They sniff at my heart.
Such a strange time it is…

They punish kissing 

at crossroads—
everywhere;
no exit, no excuse.
We must hide
love in the darkness of the night.
.
.
.
.
JUST SAYING
HIDE LOVE [IN THE DARKNESS OF THE NIGHT]
Mon. 12 Oct. 2o2o
Rudy Ram. Rumbaoa
Today@Maui
https://poemssongsphotographsandmemories.wordpress.com

[photo credit to the owner]